New York Explorer

I am a born and raised Manhattanite studying English Literature at NYU ('14), working as a journalist for the New York Post and USA Today, and living on the Upper East Side. I love to document my escapades in the city. All photos are taken by me. Enjoy!

After hours Met Museum preview of Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century.

brightlightsatnight asked: Hey I'm looking into transferring into a college in NY and I wanted to know if they're are any good colleges other than NYU that are in the city... If you anything about Hunter College?

Hi there,

Please see my F.A.Q.

Good luck!

Sincerely,

NYE

swimwiththefish asked: Hi NYE, I'm having the pleasure of visiting the city in May. Do you have any ideas of what I can do in the city with a 100 dollar a day budget?

Dear swimwiththefish,

There is TONS you can do on a $100 a day! I will give you a sample itinerary and then let my followers make some additional suggestions:

  1. First and foremost, get a MetroCard and download a subway map onto your smartphone (or get a subway map). You can put as much or as little money on your MetroCard, but this is your key to the city, so make sure you put a sufficient amount on it.
  1. Take a walk in Central Park (FREE): Central Park is Manhattan’s main nature hub, but gives you access to the beautiful Upper East and West sides, in addition to Harlem and Central Park South, which is littered with shops and gives direct access to 5th Avenue. Although walking these distances may seem insurmountable, I suggest getting lost and visiting some of its major landmarks (e.g. the Great Lawn, Shakespeare’s Garden, and Strawberry Fields).
  1. When walking through the park, if you end up on the east side, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art (FREE). Although they have “suggested” donations, you do not have to give any money to get in to the museum.
  1. After going to the Met, you can grab a hotdog at one of the vendors stationed outside the museum. A typical New York City hotdog can cost anywhere from $2 to $5 (which is overpriced, IMO) depending on where you are.
  1. If you end up on the west side, I suggest finding your way over to Harlem, where you can see beautiful Morningside Park and just west of that is Columbia University (FREE). Explore the campus and pop into the bookstore on Broadway and 114th St.
  1. If you end up on the south side of Central Park, walk downtown to 42nd St. and 5th Avenue, where you will find the grand entrance of the New York Public Library’s main branch (FREE, unless you choose to view one of its exhibits). There is a coffee shop inside and its architectural presence - inside and outside - is sublime.
  1. Then, to avoid the rest of midtown, I would suggest walking to Grand Central Station: view the inside and then take the 6 train downtown to Astor Place. Head east to St. Mark’s Place. Here, you will find a cornucopia of cheap food: Gran Sichuan, Mamoun’s Felafel and The Dumpling Man. A typical meal for two people at Gran Sichuan costs about $17, not including tip, and Mamoun’s felafel sandwiches cost $3.50. Mamoun’s also has a location on MacDougal St., closer to N.Y.U. and Washington Square Park: on nice, warm evenings it is great to buy a felafel sandwich and then eat it in the park with some friends. Lastly, I can’t remember how much The Dumpling Man costs, but it is rather inexpensive.

I hope this will inspire you a bit! Safe travels and I hope you have a glorious experience in city!

That being said, do any of my followers have any other suggestions?

Sincerely,

NYE

woah-megusta asked: I'm going to NY this summer and I want to stay in a hotel that is as close as possible to all the touristy stuff in NY. Do you have any area recommendations for not having to move a lot to visit the "important" stuff? Or even a specific hotel? :) thanks x

Dear woah-megusta,

If you want to be in the thick of the touristy places, I suggest Times Square: you are, quite literally, in the middle of it all. If you head just twenty or so blocks uptown on the west side, you hit Lincoln Center, which has the arts scene. If you head a little further east from Times Square, you can hit places like the MoMa. But, honestly, Manhattan is such a small island (assuming you will only be visiting Manhattan landmarks) that it won’t be very difficult for you to move from east to west, and uptown to downtown.

Hope this helps!

Sincerely,

NYE

A little girl and her nanny walking home down Park Ave.

A little girl and her nanny walking home down Park Ave.

532 West 111th St. - The Charlemange

532 West 111th St. - The Charlemange

Brown Ivy

Brown Ivy

Shakespeare’s Garden in Central Park

Shakespeare’s Garden in Central Park

A matching couple on Park Avenue…

Looking up Broadway in Harlem

Looking up Broadway in Harlem

113th and Morningside Drive.

113th and Morningside Drive.

Found on 7th St. and 2nd Ave.

Found on 7th St. and 2nd Ave.

Hair envy in the waiting area of Eve Salon in Greenwich Village

Having cocktails in the Great Hall of the Met after the museum has closed is a surreal experience.